We Ought to Love WHO?

“We Ought to Love WHO?”

Luke 6:27-36 (6:35) – February 20, 2022

            Who has ever grumbled at people? Who has ever been frustrated with people? Who has ever been downright angry with people? Are these people you know, your friends? Perhaps you felt that way about your loved ones, your family? We have all had that happen, from time to time. And sometimes, more often than that. But – that is when we are angry with our friends or family. Jesus says something quite different about our enemies. What would Jesus do?

            Our Lord Jesus talks Godly behavior in our Scripture reading today from Luke 6. Here are just a couple of verses: 27 “But to you who are listening I say: Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, 28 bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you 30 Give to everyone who asks you, and if anyone takes what belongs to you, do not demand it back. 31 Do to others as you would have them do to you.”

            As we listen to Jesus’ words, we might think to ourselves, “We ought to love WHO? That’s a tall order, Lord! Pretty near impossible!”

            Let’s back up, and see where these words come from. One of my favorite commentators Karoline Lewis tells us to take the long view, to consider where Jesus is coming from in this section of the Gospel of Luke. Our Scripture reading today comes from Luke’s Sermon on the Plain. What came just before this sermon, before Luke’s version of the Beatitudes? “Jesus has just named apostles from the crowd of his disciples and these blessings and woes on the plain are his first words to the newly commissioned. ‘Whoa! Stop right there! Before we go any further, here’s what you need to know.’[1] Jesus uses some interjections, a grammatical term for the typical exclamation words “Hey!” “Whoa!” and “Watch out!”

            This reminds me of certain times when my children (now in their 20’s and 30’s) were small. They would bicker and fight back and forth, and the last thing they would want to do would be listen to me, their mother. Sometimes, one or the other would be so frustrated or angry they would burst out, “You’re not the boss of me!” Too often, we don’t like to have people boss us around, either. However, Jesus is trying to get the disciples’ attention. And, He is trying to get our attention, too. Jesus says, “Listen up, people!”

Many people think of the Gospel of Matthew’s Sermon on the Mount as one of the high points of Jesus’s preaching ministry. In case you did not know, the material covered in the Sermon on the Mount is summarized in Luke’s Sermon on the Plain, in about one third of the space. Jesus did say a lot of controversial things, a lot of which got Him into serious hot water with religious leaders. But, “love your enemies” is a particularly troublesome statement. 

            Hating your enemies is only natural. Hating people who do bad things to you, who speak mean words to us – and about us! – who actively go out of their way to be mean and nasty – that would be only natural. That is, according to the wisdom of the world. Except – Jesus tells us we are not of the world any longer. In multiple places in Scripture, in both the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament, followers of God are called to another way of living.

In this Sermon on the Plain (as well as the Sermon of the Mount), Jesus reminds us of a different way, a Godly way. A way that is God-honoring. Except, Jesus uses expressive and arresting words to get us to listen! “Whoa! Here’s what’s important, disciples of mine. Whoa! Here’s what you need to hold on to.”

When many people hate others, revenge is a natural outgrowth of that hatred. Our Lord Jesus and His teaching go in the opposite direction of hatred and revenge. ”Don’t be quick to revenge but try to find a way of reconciliation. Jesus wants to change the spirit of irritation, anger and hatred inside of us. Irritation, anger, hatred and retaliation only seem to heap gasoline on the fire of conflict. Jesus is teaching his disciples another way of dealing with revenge.” [2] Yes, and another, God-honoring way to deal with hatred, too.

That’s all very well, but how can I change how I feel inside? My toes were stepped on! My feelings were really bruised! I was badly hurt! I was injured, even abused!! What do I do with all of that?”

Let me tell you: I may not be able to change the way I feel (or you feel), deep down. But, God can. At times, it happens right away. More often, the process is gradual. The important part is to get to the point that you are willing. Willing to be willing. Willing to let God help you. Help you to be forgiving, to let go of the hurt, the pain, the desire for revenge. And, God will come alongside of you and help.

There are certain situations that are very damaging. Damaging to people’s psyche, sometimes their physical bodies, and not least, their souls. I am thinking of horrible situations of abuse, of pain and degradation. I would not demand anyone to do anything that would cause even more pain and suffering, in the case of trauma and intense hurt. I would suggest that God might gently come alongside and help begin the healing process. Little by little. And, there are reputable counselors, medical professionals, therapists and social workers who are especially  trained to help in those cases, too.

Still, Jesus’ words have great effect. We are to listen up! And, follow Jesus.

Carolyn Brown, retired Director of Children’s Ministries, has a great way to summarize this section of Luke. “Love your enemies. Do good to those who hate you.  Pray for those who are mean to you. Do to others as you would have them do to you. Love and do good to all without expecting anything in return.” [3]

I come back to the question of the day: What Would Jesus Do? He calls us to go. Do that. And if you need help? Ask Jesus. He will help us to love everyone, and help us to follow Him.

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my other blogs: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!


[1] https://www.workingpreacher.org/dear-working-preacher/woes-and-whoas

[2] http://www.sermonsfromseattle.com/series_c_loving_your_enemies_and_people_you_dont_like_GA.htm

[3] http://worshipingwithchildren.blogspot.com/2019/01/