Hallowed Is Christ Jesus

“Hallowed Is Christ Jesus”

Philippians 3:4b-14 (3:8-9) – April 3, 2022

            Lots of words are old-fashioned. To say it another way, lots of words in the dictionary are words not much used today. Many people don’t know quite what they really mean. Have you ever thought about the word “hallowed?” I know, we say the word regularly when we pray the Lord’s Prayer. But, what does that word truly mean?

            In our Scripture reading today from Philippians chapter 3, Paul makes some audacious, over-the-top statements about himself. But more than that, Paul makes some extraordinary statements about Jesus. Paul’s total commitment is to Jesus Christ. Paul gives and lives as he does because he knows God (Jesus Christ) is hallowed. Sadly, many people do not have a clear idea about the word hallowed.  Before we can pray the Lord’s Prayer with understanding, we all need to learn that hallowed is another word for holy. Separated. Set apart[1]

            Think about it: “Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name.”

            Let’s back up, and take a closer look at this reading. Paul starts out by clearly boasting about himself. Writing to fellow believers in Philippi, Paul admits that his heritage and reputation could give him more reason than most people to place confidence in his spiritual pedigree. [2] This is one place where we can learn a great deal about the Apostle Paul! He goes over his resume, essentially, ticking off his wonderful credentials one by one. This is a surefire way to lift himself up, certainly. Talk about being a show-off!

            Do you recognize anyone you know in these words of Paul? I am reminded of people who are obsessed with important credentials, boastful and really full of themselves. This could be people trying awfully hard to get ahead, to claw their way to the top, by making sure their resume is top notch. Only having the best of the best listed on that piece of paper!

            Was this kind of activity putting God first? And, what about these boastful, obsessed people – do they have any sort of relationship with God? Do they consider God holy, or hallowed? Or do they ever think of God at all, except for paying God lip service on those occasional times when they recited the Lord’s Prayer?

            But, those are only the first three verses of our reading. Paul does an abrupt about-face in verses 7 and 8. But whatever were gains to me I now consider loss for the sake of Christ. What is more, I consider everything a loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things.” See how the Apostle Paul makes another extraordinary statement? The overwhelming grace of God – the surpassing worth of knowing Christ – calls Paul to a new, heavenly set of values.

            We will shortly be celebrating Communion, after this sermon. Here at this church, we do not usually say the Sanctus as a part of the Communion liturgy, since we use a shorter form of that section of the service. This part of the Communion liturgy is quite ancient. Here is the Sanctus: “Holy! Holy! Holy! Lord, God of Hosts! Heaven and earth are full of your glory!”  

            See how this statement fits into that Godly set of values from the Apostle Paul! “Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name.”

I invite you to consider the Sanctus when saying the beginning of the Lord’s Prayer. Imagine joining everyone who ever lived, lives now, and is already in heaven saying together that God’s name is hallowed. Because – God truly is holy!

What does Paul say next? “I consider [my worldly gains] garbage, that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which is through faith inChrist—the righteousness that comes from God on the basis of faith.” Paul describes the value of all these worldly gains – all his marvelous resume – comparing it to the value system of the kingdom of Christ Jesus his Lord — complete rubbish! Absolute trash! That is where his outstanding resume belongs, compared to Christ Jesus our Lord!

               The Gospel reading for today comes from John 12, where Mary anoints Jesus’ feet while He is at dinner, in preparation for His death. “Like Mary pouring out her love by pouring expensive perfume, Paul shows his love and desire to know Christ by pouring out his credentials and achievements, his life, and considering them all rubbish (the Greek word also means “dung” and “excrement”) in comparison to the life to be gained in Christ.” [3]

            How much more can we consider our Lord to be holy? How much more meaningful can it be to say “Our Father, who are in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name,” compared to worldly credentials, or mere human achievements – compared to Christ Jesus our Lord.

            Paul’s goal, and our goal, is to know Christ! That holy, hallowed, set-apart Son of God, the one who reconciled us to God and bestowed upon all of us God’s gift of His righteousness. Praise God, Christ has redeemed us and we now walk in the newness of life.

            One last call to action, from the Apostle Paul: we are to straighten our priorities. Follow God’s priorities, God’s values, and follow Jesus. Make it your priority – my priority – our calling to know Christ intimately, and the power of His resurrection. Then, we surely can pray “Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name,” not only understand it, but mean it, too! Thanks be to God.

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my other blogs: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!


[1] http://worshipingwithchildren.blogspot.com/2016/02/year-c-fifth-sunday-in-lent-march-13.html

[2] https://desperatepreacher.com//texts/phil3_4/phil3_4.htm

[3] https://desperatepreacher.com//texts/phil3_4/phil3_4.htm

Know Joy – Know Jesus!

“Know Joy – Know Jesus!” – August 30, 2020

Phil 3-10 That-I-may-know-Him

Philippians 3:1, 4-11 (3:8)

What is really important to you? Some people value family or friends. Others think material possessions are important. Some consider a marvelous resume to be valued above all else. Each of these can make some people satisfied, and that’s only the start of the list of important things. Many things hold value to many people, and cause them to be satisfied in life.

Is being a rule-follower important? When we dot every “I” and cross every “T” – carefully making absolutely sure that we are obeying every law; is that the thing some people value the most in their lives?

The apostle Paul said that this description described him exactly – a rule-follower who dotted every “I” and crossed every “T.” He gives us his marvelous resume, in some detail. We find out that Paul was born to a well-respected Jewish clan in the tribe of Benjamin. He was properly brought up in the Jewish faith, and even chose to live as a Pharisee, as one of the strictest followers of the Jewish Law that it was possible to be. The old Saul went overboard in his devotion to God, too – so devoted that he even persecuted the early Church.

Do you know anyone like that? Anyone who is so strict at following the rules that they even frown and get angry at their friends and family – regularly? What would the old Paul, the Pharisee Saul, have been like as a friend? Always trying to be super-righteous, always working hard at being perfect – Paul tells us straight out that he used to be a miserable person while he tried as hard as he could to be super-righteous.

I wonder what kinds of bullet points Paul – or as he was in his Pharisee days, Saul – would have on his letters of recommendation? “Pharisee Saul is one of the most righteous people I know.” Or, “The highest praise I can give to Pharisee Saul is he never, ever makes a mistake.” If anybody could possibly save himself through his own super-strict efforts at living according to the Mosaic Laws, I bet it would have been Paul, or as he was before, Pharisee Saul.

But – Paul found his own self-righteous actions and trying to make himself righteous enough for God just did not work. There was no way he could earn enough “brownie points” to be acceptable to God.

In other places in the New Testament, Paul describes what an awful mess he was in when he realized this! The Pharisee Saul had lived his whole life acting self-righteous, putting on a show. But here, in Philippians, Paul cuts straight to the chase. He tells us that he no longer trusts in himself or his qualifications. Instead he trusts in Christ! Absolutely, one hundred percent.

I am not sure whether you get excited about accounting. You know, the language of numbers, statements of profit and loss. But, that is exactly what Paul uses here. He uses accounting terms! “The end of a profit and loss statement shows the net loss or net income, indicating the extent to which a business, craft or household is profitable.” [1]

Paul is saying here that all his trying to be super-righteous, in his own power, got him absolutely nowhere! As far as the profit and loss statement of his life before God, he was absolutely bankrupt! There was no way he could possibly even approach God – except through trusting Jesus Christ as Lord.

And then – and then! Paul uses accounting language again. Paul counts knowing Christ as “gain.” When Paul wrote down the profit and loss statement for his life before God, ALL the gain, ALL the profit was credited to Jesus! As Paul came to understand what a miracle happened when he put his trust and hope in Christ Jesus, he became more and more excited.

Paul willingly, eagerly left behind all of his marvelous religious resume. Marvelous as far as the world is concerned. Paul actually uses a swear word here, in verse 8. “I consider everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things.” – meaning, putting aside all his training, and superior resume, and everything else – “I consider them garbage, that I may gain Christ.” We might think of a four-letter word to use here, and that is exactly what Paul uses in the original Greek.

“Paul regards ‘everything’ of little value in comparison with the far greater worth, the supreme advantage, of knowing Christ.” [2] To gain Christ – to have Jesus one hundred percent on the profit side of our profit and loss statement before God – is the most marvelous thing in the world to Paul. He is so, so joy-filled about this, he almost bursts with joy!

Paul told the friends in Philippi about his boundless joy at knowing Christ Jesus so closely, and so well, even though he was in prison, chained to a Roman soldier 24/7! He still overflowed with joy! Is that true for us? Are we in the same joyful position as the apostle Paul? Are we overflowing with joy because we know Jesus? Or, is our joy being blocked or diverted?

Life was certainly no walk in the park for Paul, especially now. Yet, we can almost feel his joy right through the printed page. Even though, hardship – yet, there was joy! Even though, trials – yet, Paul felt joy! Even though, sickness – yet, Paul and his friends were joyful!

I realize you and I are probably not in the happiest of places right now, with uncertainty and anxiety all around us. Yet, Paul reminds us, we can have joy! If we place our trust and hope in Jesus Christ, His joy is available to us, any time! What a marvelous promise. Be joyful in Christ Jesus. No matter what.

[1] http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=1592

Commentary, Philippians 3:4b-14 (Lent 5C), Elizabeth Shively, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2013.

[2] http://www.lectionarystudies.com/lent5ce.html

“The Prize,” Rev. Bryan Findlayson, Lectionary Bible Studies and Sermons, Pumpkin Cottage Ministry Resources.

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my regular blog for 2020: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and my other blog,  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!