In Remembrance

“In Remembrance”

1 Corinthians 11:23-26 (11:24) – April 14, 2022

          Many people wonder about Maundy Thursday. Some know it is a part of Holy Week, the final week when Jesus was on earth. It’s also called Holy Thursday, the day that Jesus washed His disciples’ feet. But, many people are not even sure about what “Maundy” means, anyway? “Maundy” comes from the Latin word mandatum (or commandment). It’s used for our Lord Jesus’ words “I give you a new commandment,” spoken at that Passover dinner on the night before the Crucifixion. In other words, commemorated tonight.            

This service tonight is not just for adults – by no means! One of my favorite biblical commentators is Carolyn Brown, a retired Presbyterian Children’s Ministry Director. She notes that, sadly, many congregations do not encourage children or even young people to attend these Holy Week services. “The fact that it is on a school night makes it easy to decide that children will not be able to come and therefore to neither plan for their presence nor encourage them and their families to come.  After a few years of such expectations it takes more than one or two “children are welcome” notes to reverse the trend.” [1]

We are going to celebrate the Lord’s Supper tonight, as is celebrated at many churches. Many congregations and churches do not include children in observing Communion! Why on earth did this happen? Paul reminded his readers that our Lord Jesus commanded His disciples – His followers – to partake or participate in the Lord’s Supper. And, whenever we partake, we do this in remembrance of Jesus! Meals and memory do get all tied up together, don’t they?

Paul wrote to his friends and former church members when he wrote the letters to the Corinthian church. This was a church that was fighting. The congregation members had some serious issues! Looking at Paul’s letter as a whole, people were bickering, arguing, and sometimes even bringing lawsuits against each other. And in the middle of all of Paul’s advice to the church members, he puts this marvelous assurance of the presence of the risen Lord Jesus! Paul also corrects some other practices, like eating in joint congregational meals.

“The supper of unity has become one of disunity. As Paul says, “When the time comes to eat, each of you goes ahead with your own supper, and one goes hungry and another becomes drunk . . . do you show contempt for the church of God and humiliate those who have nothing?” (11: 21-22) The major conflict is between the “haves” and “have-nots,” the rich and the poor, revealing the socioeconomic tension at the Corinthian table.” [2] 
          Talk about problems in the church today! Differences between the “haves” and “have-nots,” conflict between believers of different languages, leaving out the children and the young people, plus fighting between people who have differing (even conflicting) beliefs about the meaning of the Lord’s Supper! What sort of joining together, or unifying demonstration of followers of Jesus Christ is this?

Stories are important on this night. The key story we highlight is the bread and cup of the Last Supper.  But, the failure of the church in Corinth to gather as a loving community to celebrate communion is also important! And, we all need to remember the commemoration of the Passover dinner is also part of this special night. Meals and memory are important!

In the letter to the Corinthian church, “Paul is not talking about the Lord’s Supper as a liturgical rite in a church building. At this point in history, there were no separate buildings for Christian worship. The Lord’s Supper was a meal eaten by a community in private homes, pot-luck style. The Lord’s Supper happened as part of the common meal.” [3]

In fact, some churches do celebrate Communion on special occasions in this way – commonly called a Love Feast, congregations gather around a table for a meal. They break bread with one another, with the Lord’s Supper as a highlight of this meal.

Paul had a concern for the proper eating and drinking of the Eucharist at this first-century common meal: “For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until He comes.” Equally important, Paul wants us to recognize the body of Christ in our brothers and sisters. “To properly discern the body at the table means that we cannot come while leaving others uninvited and unwelcomed, or without mourning their absence. We cannot leave the table and be content to leave anyone hungry. To discern the body in the Supper will send us into the world with new eyes and new hearts, to encounter Christ there.” [4]

We come to the Communion table for a whole host of reasons, then! We give a clear invitation to families to join all God’s people! Everyone hears the stories of the most important days of the year and celebrates this holy sacrament that was introduced on that night.  Remember, “the Eucharist has added power on Maundy Thursday.  Just to be there participating in the sacrament on this night says that I am one of God’s people.”  All of us are God’s people!  Because each of us are welcomed at this table, I belong. You belong. God extends a welcome to each one of us.

Who would Jesus welcome to His table? Each one. Every one. Even you, even me. Amen! 


[1] http://worshipingwithchildren.blogspot.com/2014/02/year-holy-or-maundy-thursday-april-17.html

[2] http://www.theafricanamericanlectionary.org/PopupLectionaryReading.asp?LRID=67

[3] Ibid.

[4] https://www.workingpreacher.org/commentaries/revised-common-lectionary/maundy-thursday/commentary-on-1-corinthians-1123-26-12

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my other blogs: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!

Remember Through Generations

“Remember Through Generations”

 

Exodus 12:1-14, I Corinthians 11:23-26  – April 9, 2020

Jesus Last Supper, 2

Do you look at social media much? Maybe, Facebook? Instagram? Or perhaps, Twitter? In case you are not as familiar with these social media sites, there is a popular Internet trend that has been circulating for about ten years. It’s called (Hashtag) Throwback Thursday, or #TBT.“ This hashtag is used by people all over the world to share and relive their past experiences with anyone they want—both positive and negative experiences.

As I considered the Bible readings for this solemn evening, I could not help but think of #ThrowbackThursday. Perhaps the main reason is because when our Lord Jesus was at dinner with His disciples on that Thursday night 2000 years ago, it was Passover they commemorated with that special dinner.

That event was when Moses led the Jewish people out of Egypt, out of slavery, into freedom. But before Pharaoh was convinced to let the Jews leave, the Lord sent plagues upon Egypt. It is at this point we take up the narrative. The Lord is going to send a horrible last plague; the firstborn son in each household across Egypt would die. In order to escape that plague, Jews were instructed to smear blood from a lamb on the lintel of each house. Then, the angel of death would know not to kill any in that household. The angel would pass over that house.

Have you had Bible experiences duplicated in your life? Like, right here, here and now? Not necessarily a Passover dinner with a roast lamb—although some modern-day Jews are kind enough to invite non-Jews to their homes for a Passover dinner, or seder. But, have Bible experiences happened to you?

We are going to remember the dinner that Jesus shared with His disciples that Thursday night, 2000 years ago. Why? Because Jesus told us to remember Him.

Morgan read about the details of the Passover lamb from Exodus as our Scripture reading tonight. Holy Week and Easter as two springtime festivals, but they do not always coincide. This year, as sometimes happens, they do. As Christians mark some of the holiest days of their religious year, so do Jews. Remember #ThrowbackThursday? #TBT has special significance this year. Not only for our Lord Jesus as He remembered the Passover with His disciples, along with Jews in that time and place, but Jews today still remember, still look back to that Exodus event.

This spring is also a very different season because of the coronavirus pandemic. This health emergency has made everything more difficult for everyone. With these shelter-in-place orders for everyone’s safety and well-being, people are more anxious and fearful than usual. For some people, of whatever faith, even their faith wears thin sometimes.

How are you holding up, with Easter on hold this year? Doing things differently? Perhaps some of your friends or acquaintances are celebrating Passover in a very different way this year, too. How are they doing? People snap at each other, especially when they are forced into close quarters together. What is more, with so many restrictions on our movement—at least, here in suburban Chicago, as well as other major cities—life feels closed-in, and claustrophobic. Have you or your family felt that way? This is a great concern during this quarantine, especially for people who track spousal abuse, child and elder abuse, and violence in households. Help is available. If you or someone you love can use the National Domestic Violence Hotline, the toll-free number is 1-800-799-7233. In such tense times, I am glad caring, helpful people are at the other end of the phone.

Where else can we turn, but to God? As the Bible describes to us time and again, God has been there for others, in Bible times, throughout history, throughout similar crises of war and strife, of deadly illness and pandemic, of natural disaster, and of famine and starvation. Yes, all these things have happened, and yes, Jesus has been here through it all, right by our sides.

We come to this night. We come to the table, this table. Jesus gathered with His friends around another table, in that Upper Room. He said the words that Paul gave to us in a letter to the Corinthian church, those words we know today as the Words of Institution. Yes, Jesus, on the night He was betrayed, took bread. He took the cup. He blessed them, and passed the bread and cup to His disciples. He said about that event, “Remember Me.”

There is such a deep connection. The command in Exodus tells the Jews to remember. The words of Jesus tell His followers to remember. And each time we gather around a table like this, we repeat the Words of Institution, urging us to remember. We remember the gracious promises of God, throughout the generations. We remember the mighty power of God, the comforting presence of God, and the saving grace of God, throughout the generations.

I know that my faith falters, at such a difficult time as this. Some of my friends and acquaintances shyly admit the same. That is why it is so important to come together—virtually, if need be. We can perform the centuries-old practice of Communion on Maundy Thursday, where we remember those words Jesus spoke to a room of friends around a table. We can be strengthened spiritually by the Body and Blood of our Lord. Even though separated physically, we can pray for God’s holy presence to be with each of us in a special way tonight.

As we come to the table, let us also come to God with our hearts open wide. Let us come to the feast with Him who died for us, giving praise and thanksgiving for this great gift, as we all remember. Amen.  

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my regular blog for 2020: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and my other blog,  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!