An Opportune Time

“An Opportune Time”

Luke 4:1-13 (4:13) – March 6, 2022

            Have you ever been tempted? For little (and sometimes, bigger) people, these do not need to be big temptations. Smaller, everyday temptations can be troublesome enough. Like, a plate of delicious cookies left on the counter. Or, a cool item – like a late-model smart phone, or a fancy set of ear pods – left unattended in a very public place. Or even, some test answers in such plain view that you can hardly help but see them on the desk nearby. [1]

            What do we do, with such delicious temptations practically begging us to give in?

            This is the first Sunday of Lent, and our Scripture reading today is from Luke’s Gospel: the narrative of the temptation of Jesus. Each week in Lent we will look at one of the phrases of the Lord’s Prayer. They will not be in order, but they all are there. Today’s connection is to “lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.”

            We all know what temptation is. (Don’t we?) I gave several examples just now. Sometimes people can see temptation a mile away, and do the right thing right away. Other times, the temptation can sneak up on us. Or, be overwhelming, or even seductive and alluring. And then, you all know what happens. We give in to temptation.

            As we followed the Gospel reading this morning, the reading from Luke started with Jesus being led into the wilderness to be tempted by the Devil for 40 days.    A verse from Hebrews gives us additional insight into the “why” of it. Jesus was “tempted in every way as we are,” and yet He did not sin. He had no sin. Even thought the Devil tried his best (or, worst) to tempt away at Jesus, Jesus did not succumb. Jesus did not fall prey to any of the presentations, any of the temptations.

This first Sunday in Lent we are reminded of just several days ago, when so many people around the world had ash crosses put on their foreheads. Yes, that was the visible symbol. Ash Wednesday also means self-examination, and confession, and admitting that each of us is limited, imperfect, and each of us needs to face our own mortality. Our sinfulness, too. [2]

            Face it, each of us is only here on earth for a brief time. Psalm 103 tells us that “14 for God knows how we are formed, God remembers that we are dust. 15 The life of mortals is like grass, they flourish like a flower of the field; 16 the wind blows over it and it is gone, and its place remembers it no more.”

That is the reminder of the Ash Wednesday cross, and the liturgical words said at the beginning of Lent each year: “dust you are, to dust you shall return” is what we hear as the ashes are applied to our foreheads. We are marked with mortality for this Lenten journey, and that is sobering enough for anyone. And on top of that, we are called to be self-reflective and to contemplate where we fall short. By extension, we come to the first Sunday of Lent, and are encouraged to do the same thing because we are all marked with mortality,

Our Lord Jesus was led into the wilderness, because that is where you and I commonly live. Wasn’t He a human being just as we are? Jesus was out there hungry and hurting just as we are hungry and hurting, too. Jesus was tempted in all things, just as we are, too.

Most of all, we may be tempted by shortcuts. Wasn’t Jesus tempted by the Devil by that very thing – shortcuts? Sure, all the kingdoms of the world will eventually belong to Jesus, except not just yet. But, the Devil tempts Jesus with those exact things. “All of these kingdoms will be yours right now, if you bow and worship me!” The same with the temptation of loaves of bread. “Turn these stones into bread. You know how easy it will be! Come on, you can do it!” And again, the Devil brought Jesus to the highest place on the Temple and said, “see, if you jump off, God will for sure save you. Angels will come and lift you up! You know they will – come on, I bet you won’t do it. I double dog dare you!

Each of these temptations are shortcuts to power, glory and majesty, which are the Son of God’s by right. Except, the Devil twists them, and tries to convince us all that it’s okay. It’s what God would want…isn’t it? Just as the Devil tried to convince our Lord Jesus, tried of offer Him to claim these glorious things without suffering, without dying, the easy way. Take a shortcut. We may be tempted to take that shortcut, too! [3]   

Our reading ends with an ominous note that the Adversary went away until an opportune time. We could spend some time speculating on when that opportune time might have been for Jesus. But it might be better for us to realize that opportune times come all too often in our lives, and that the Devil can sneak up on us unaware, too.

We all need help to stay on God’s path. We all need someone who will help us to stay focused on God, and especially not to take shortcuts, as tempting as they may be. We can “find someone who can help keep us on track. Find someone who will help us think about the choices we make. Find someone who will fill us out. Better yet, find a group of someones – a community of faith that will help make sure we think with a full mind.” [4]

Won’t you continue walking with Jesus? I pray that we all can stick together and keep on the journey to the Cross. That is the best way to avoid temptation that I’ve found yet: stick close to Jesus. Amen!

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my other blogs: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!


[1] http://worshipingwithchildren.blogspot.com/2016/01/year-c-first-sunday-in-lent-february-14.html

[2] https://www.umcdiscipleship.org/worship-planning/gathered-up-in-jesus/first-sunday-in-lent-year-c-lectionary-planning-notes

[3] https://www.umcdiscipleship.org/worship-planning/gathered-up-in-jesus/first-sunday-in-lent-year-c-lectionary-planning-notes

[4] Ibid.