Joy in Humility

“Joy in Humility” – August 16, 2020

Phil 2-5 same mind

Philippians 2:3-11 (2:3-5)

When you see a child dressing up like their mom, dad, older brother or sister, or other trusted adult, what immediately pops into your mind? What I immediately think of is that this dear child is dressing up as a beloved older person because they really want to be that person! It’s not just wearing Mom’s or Grandma’s high heeled shoes. Whether it’s dressing up in a nurse’s scrubs, a mechanic’s coveralls or a scientist’s lab coat, that child is trying their hardest to be just like that grown-up.

As we consider the Scripture reading read to us today, we might think of something like this – imitating our beloved grown-ups. But, can you and I actually do what Paul suggests here? Paul, you are making a huge leap, expecting us little, insignificant humans to be like – have a mindset like – think the same way as our Lord Jesus! That is asking for the moon! Isn’t it?

That is what Paul says in verse 5, yes. Let’s go back further. He says a similar thing in verses 3 and 4: our attitude – on the inside! – is supposed to change. Radically!

We are not just to play dress-up, we are not supposed to simply put on a nurse’s uniform or a firefighter’s coat. Paul calls each of us to be humble. Paul wants us to pay attention to our insides! It’s an internal job, where each of us changes our attitude to one of humility.

What is humility, anyhow? If we examine the cultural backdrop of Paul’s words more closely, humility had a very different connotation in the first century. Humility – the act of being humble was not considered in a positive light, at all! The widespread, worldly view of being humble went along with being a menial, a servant, even a slave.

However … that was not the way the Bible looked at this way of thinking. No, some religious groups viewed being humble as “the appropriate attitude both toward God and toward other members of the community.” [1] Plus, the apostle Paul here reminds the Philippian believers to consider others before we think about ourselves; to recognize the abilities, rights and achievements of others! This is exactly how Paul describes Jesus Christ several verses later.

Paul tells his friends – and by extension, us! – that we are to have the same attitude and same mindset as our Lord! That completely blows me away. Wow. Double wow!

Lots of situations, differences and conflicts can pull people away from the Lord. We can see these happening all around us, on a regular basis. Some of these feelings, emotions and situations are so powerful! Not only pulling us away from each other, but also away from the Lord. It is so difficult to focus, to have our mindset and attitude the same as our Lord Jesus!

Paul’s words “seem carefully chosen, no doubt to make a lasting impression on his readers. He then evokes by contrast some of the root causes of division and finally returns to the image of having a ‘same mind’. Only now, this mind is not theirs but Christ’s.” [2]

Paul was not just speaking to an individual here. The word “you” Paul uses (every time!) is a plural “you!” This attitude, this mindset is for the whole group of the Philippian believers. Paul did not mean for his friends, the believers in Philippi, to be solo Christians. No Lone Rangers! It’s possible to lean on each other when some get tired. We all depend on each other. We seek to be Christians together, and to have a mindset like Christ, together!

One of my favorite expressions is “What would Jesus do?” What would our Lord do in a situation like this? How would He react? How would He treat others? Would Jesus be selfish? Would Jesus be mean? Would Jesus snub people or be disrespectful to others? I think we all know the answer: certainly not!

Paul does not stop here. These next verses are among the most significant and moving descriptions of our Lord Jesus Christ in the whole New Testament. Paul goes back in time, to the time before the human Jesus was born in Bethlehem, and he talks about the pre-incarnate, eternal Son, the Second Person of the Trinity. The Eternal Son, the Word that was in the beginning, voluntarily gave up all Godhood. Jesus became the Word made flesh, setting aside the form of God. Jesus emptied Himself and became a helpless human baby.

Jesus humbled Himself! Just as Paul tells us to do! We are to strive to have the attitude, the mindset of our Lord Jesus Christ!

But, wait! That is not all. Not by a long shot! After Jesus became obedient to God, even to the point of death on a cross for our sins, God highly exalted Him! Jesus was—is given the name that is above every name! At the name of Jesus, every knee should bow, and every tongue confess that Jesus is Lord, to the glory of God!

Do we believe that? What does that mean to you? To me? What does it really mean? Are you – am I ready to bow the knee and confess that Jesus is Lord? Are we to strive to have the mindset and attitude of Jesus? Conventional, worldly attitudes scoff at this humility. What, be a servant? Where does this guy Paul get off, telling me to act like a slave, a menial, and not do anything for myself? That’s plain silly! That’s stupid, even!

Except, that is EXACTLY what Paul is saying here. We are not to act selfishly, have out-of-line ambition, or act in a conceited way. Again, “what would Jesus do?” Jesus would have concern for all people! Jesus would serve and love and care for all people, whether He is humble or exalted. No matter who, no matter where, no matter what!  

Let us strive to have the mindset and attitude of our Lord Jesus. Remember to check: “What would Jesus do?” And then, go! Have an attitude like Jesus, to the glory of God.

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my regular blog for 2020: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and my other blog,  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!

[I would like to express deep appreciation for Dr. Hooker’s invaluable commentary on chapter 2 of “The Letter to the Philippians.” (Hooker, Morna D., “The Letter to the Philippians,” The New Interpreters Bible Commentary, Vol. XI (Abingdon, Nashville, TN: 2000). I have used several concepts she wrote about in sections 2:1-4 and 2:5-11. Thanks so much for contributing to my personal understanding of this foundational passage for the study of the person of our Lord Jesus Christ.]

[1] Hooker, Morna D., “The Letter to the Philippians,” The New Interpreters Bible Commentary, Vol. XI (Abingdon, Nashville, TN: 2000), 499.

[2] https://www.taize.fr/en_article167.html?date=2009-10-01

“Living As Friends,” Commented Bible Passages from Taize, 2009.