Blessings in Difficult Times

“Blessings in Difficult Times”

Luke 6:17-23 (6:23) – February 13, 2022

            Have you ever gotten down on the same level as a small child? I mean, physically gotten down on the floor, or on the grass, and seen what they see? Experienced what they experienced, from their point of view? From where they are at?

            That is what I want to suggest for this week’s Scripture reading, from Luke chapter 6. But before we go there, what does this reading remind you of? It sounds like another well-known Scripture passage, from Matthew chapter 5: the Beatitudes. Except, the Beatitudes come from the Sermon on the Mount, which has a slightly different focus, another point of view.

            Let us take a look at this reading from Dr. Luke’s point of view. I’ll read from the modern translation The Message: “Jesus stood on a plain surrounded by disciples, and was soon joined by a huge congregation from all over Judea and Jerusalem, even from the seaside towns of Tyre and Sidon. They had come both to hear him and to be cured of their diseases. Those disturbed by evil spirits were healed. Everyone was trying to touch him—so much energy surging from him, so many people healed!”

            What an awe-inspiring image from Luke! Just imagine, Jesus – surrounded by huge crowds who came to hear Him preach. And also, to be cured of their diseases. A totally different angle from that of Matthew, from the Sermon on the Mount. Can you imagine this huge congregation gathering together for an extended healing ministry from the Rabbi Jesus? Plus, hearing a marvelous sermon, on top of everything? That is the setting of this Sermon on the Plain. A different retelling of the Beatitudes in our reading today. Let’s continue with the reading: “Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God. 21 Blessed are you who hunger now, for you will be satisfied. Blessed are you who weep now, for you will laugh.”

When some people read the next few verses from Luke 6, some might nod their heads. Or, say nice things, like “such wonderful words!” or “meaningful sentiments, surely!” But, are these opinions simply surface platitudes? Do people who praise this reading from Luke understand its full implications?  

The corresponding verse from Matthew 5 says “Blessed are the poor in spirit.” Not as Luke says, simply “Blessed are the poor.” Blessing those who are poor is more stark, more real. Less spiritual. Face it, less comfortable for those listening to Jesus.

Do any of us here in this church know what it is like to have real food insecurity? To only have enough for one meal a day? And that meal being canned vegetables from a food pantry? Do any of us here in this church know what it is like to live in a cheap motel room – for weeks, even months, on end? Perhaps with several school-age children who never get enough to eat, and who keep growing out of their clothes and shoes from Goodwill or the Salvation Army store? That is the sad reality for countless numbers of people across our country today – and for many people who get their food and groceries from the Maine Township Food Pantry, which we support and contribute to.

               I’ve spoken before about the Rev. Janet Hunt, who leads a Lutheran church in DeKalb, Illinois. She writes about a desperate woman who recently called their church, looking for assistance. She did not have enough for the February rent, after paying her many other bills. Rev. Hunt goes on to say, “Chances are great that the precious one who called this week would now be living in her car, if she had one, which she does not. Or she has moved in with a friend. Or maybe she found her way to our local homeless shelter. Where hopefully they had room for her.

“But with all of my imagining, I cannot presume to know what this has been for her, even if I did know the details.  And while I do not know how this is a ‘blessed’ state of being, truly I do not, I do know that she is close to the heart of God today, as is anyone, anywhere who find themselves where she is. As for the rest of us who know ourselves to be more ‘blessed’ by the world’s standards now, we would surely do well to get ourselves close to one such as her. For there, apparently is where God’s kingdom already is.

“And yet, I don’t always. Truth is, most of the time I am glad enough to let someone else take the call, listen to the pain, sort through the details.” [1]

The hard truth is that Jesus calls these dear ones, these people with very limited resources to be especially blessed. Theirs is the kingdom of heaven. These are the words that face us today. Personally, I struggle with these words of Jesus. Perhaps you do, too.   

I think of the setting once more. Jesus – surrounded by huge crowds who came to hear Him preach. And also, to be cured of their diseases. This huge congregation gathers together for an extended healing ministry from the Rabbi Jesus. Is this healing in a multitude of ways?

We just heard two sermons, for two weeks, focusing on love, which the Apostle Paul names as the number one spiritual gifts. We can look at this Sermon on the Plain from a different point of view, again highlighting love. “Love makes us economically poor but enriches our lives; ambition makes us economically secure but leaves us selfish and shallow. Our lives reveal our priorities. May God give us the power to choose love over ambition, his Kingdom over present riches.” [2]

As the body of Christ, as followers of Jesus, Jesus calls each of us to reach out to others and be His loving hands, His willing feet, His caring heart.

These are challenging words from our Lord Jesus, difficult to hear, and even more difficult to put into action. Jesus calls each of us to make the blessings of the kingdom of heaven a reality in this world today. I pray that when Jesus calls us, we listen and do. We listen and go. Jesus tells us, go, and do likewise.

Amen, alleluia.

@chaplaineliza

(Suggestion: visit me at my other blogs: matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers. #PursuePEACE – and  A Year of Being Kind . Thanks!


[1] https://dancingwiththeword.com/blessed-are-the-poor-2/

[2] http://www.word-sunday.com/Files/c/6-c/A-6-c.html

“O Brother (or Sister), Who Art Thou?” Larry Broding’s Word-Sunday.Com: A Catholic Resource for This Sunday’s Gospel.

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